Skip available courses

Available courses

BSS & BBA corePrerequisites: noneIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills
BSS & BBA corePrerequisites: ACCT 2101, minimum grade of CIn this course, students continue developing accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Students analyze information needed for financing and investing decisions and communicate alternatives and recommendations to stakeholders using spreadsheet and word processing software skills. Students evaluate operating outcomes using financial and non-financial performance measures appropriate in traditional and e-business environments
BSS electiveThis course enables students to develop the communication skills necessary to thrive in a professional setting and to create a personal career management strategy. Upon completion, students will be able to transition confidently and effectively from college to the workplace, graduate school or professional school. They will be able to communicate in a proficient, influential manner in business situations. They will also learn how to develop and apply successful communication strategies to inform, persuade, and motivate others. Students will be able to write concise business documents and deliver high-quality oral presentations. Through a combination of course and lab work, they will develop the materials necessary to launch a productive self-directed internship and job search. Additionally, they will develop long-term personal career management strategies including an understanding of graduate and professional school options. Topics will include aspects of interpersonal
Principles of Biology II. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Animal and plant biology with emphasis on structure, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week
This course introduces students to the functions of modern business. It shows the student how these functions exist in a changing society and the type of decisions which must be made within that environment. The course is also designed to expose students to the multitude of career fields in the areas of business. The importance of business in the modern society is also stressed throughout the course. Topics such as business environment, management, organization, marketing, finance, accounting, and data processing are discussed in an introductory manner. May not be taken to satisfy requirements for B.B.A. degree after junior standing has been attained without advance permission of instructor and dean.
BBA coreThis course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law, ethics, and business. The course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate.
BSS core electiveThis course examines worldwide integration of economic, political, technological, cultural, and social facets to explore the impact of globalization on organizations and individuals worldwide. Students develop a worldview of the global marketplace. They learn how to incorporate their knowledge and understanding of global markets through the simultaneous consideration of all business functions. Analytical frameworks such as SWOT are used to conduct firm and industry analyses. Special consideration is given to key issues in e-business that affect trends in international business.
BBA electivePrereq. MATH 1070In today's competitive world, statistical analysis increasingly guides decision-making. Properly gathered data can provide invaluable insights in a business, whether your goal is to improve operational processes, increase revenues, direct new developments or retain valued customers. This course teaches statistical techniques for describing and measuring data, and it provides an overview of probability concepts. It will also explore standard sampling methods and hypothesis testing, linear regression, correlation, time series and forecasting
The course is divided into three major parts. Part I covers the various dimensions of the international business field, including brief coverage of the major theories of international trade and investment. Part II deals with the environment in which international business operates, the financial variables including balance of payments, exchange rates, and capital markets along with the cultural, legal, political, and economic institutions with which international business firms may come into contact. Part III concentrates on the operational aspects of international business, the firm specific variables including marketing, finance, management, and accounting and attempts to integrate the environmental with the firm specific variables into a meaningful conceptual framework.
One semester of prearranged work in Department of Management, Marketing and General Business operational activities in a designated enterprise cooperating with the School of BSS. Students will obtain comprehensive work experience and be responsible for periodic reports and appraisals as required by the instructor. No class hours are to be met; conferences are arranged.
Non-degree program 15 hours per week 0 credits An intensive remedial course for the IUGB University Preparatory Program students to help them improve their English sufficiency to enter IUGB Prerequisites: UPP or CCE and Placement test

Non-degree program 15 hours per week 0 credits An intensive remedial course for the IUGB University Preparatory Program students to help them improve their English sufficiency to enter IUGB Prerequisites: UPP or CCE and Placement test

Non-degree program 15 hours per week 0 credits An intensive remedial course for the IUGB University Preparatory Program students to help them improve their English sufficiency to enter IUGB Prerequisites: UPP or CCE and Placement test

A remedial course for the IUGB University Preparatory Program students to help them improve their English writing sufficiency to enter IUGB--

Preparation for the internet-based TOEFL exam offered by the Educational Testing Service. The preparation course is based on the development of all language areas including the four language skills: Reading, Listening, Speaking and Writing, and Grammar and Vocabulary building to improve the test-takers? scores.
This course is to provide student with the information and technical skills required to use advanced Excel skills in the educational process for the Business Administration and other disciplines as well as entry into the work force, or increased workplace related experience.
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and logical design of computer based information systems. Emphasis is placed upon the development of requirements specifications that serve the business needs of the organization and provide the necessary base for subsequent systems development. Both data oriented and process oriented approaches are covered.
Use of Web development tools for Web site development. Architectural planning, technology selection, and Web site programming tasks. Internet applications using COM components on both the client and server.
Advanced n-tier client/server application development for an enterprise-wide setting
AKA CIS 4980This course provides the student with an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the core courses to larger and more complex problems and to gain experience in working as part of a teamPrerequisites: MATH 1070, MGS 3100, FIN 3XXX Financial Mathematics, MKT 3010, all required CIS 3000 level, 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours
Prereq: Junior or senior status and approval of Associate Dean and/or Faculty AdvisorThis course allows the student to work in industry or an agency and be mentored by an industry coach. A faculty member will supervise the internship and develop specific learning objectives that relate to the student?s goals, industry involved and the needs requirements for academic rigor.It is a supervised practicum.
Prereq: MATH 1111 or high school Algebra IIComputers and Applications. History of computers, hardware components, operating systems, application software, data communication. This course covers all of the IUGB Computer Skills course prerequisites.
Prereq: Grade of C or higher in CSC 1010 or instructor consent.An introduction to the discipline of computer science. Topics include algorithmic foundations, hardware concepts, virtual machine concepts, software systems, applications, and social issues.
Fundamental principles of computer programming. Expressions, procedures, variable types, data, input/output. Emphasis on structure and clarity as well as correctness
Computer structure and machine language, addressing techniques, macros, file I/O, program segmentation, and linkage
Computer Architecture. Logic design, combinatorial and sequential circuits, input-output devices, memory, processors, controllers, parallel architectures, bit-slicing, reduced instruction sets
Computer Networks. Introduction to computer networks; details of layered network protocols with emphasis on functionality and analysis. Principles of relevant state-of-the-art network standards
This course provides an initial overview on the topic of Information Security. It covers the basics of encryption and decryption, program security including viruses and other malicious code, application security, security in operating systems, security in networks and distributed systems, different methods of administering security, and legal and ethical issues in computer security
Fundamental programming language concepts, including syntax versus semantics, binding time, scopes, and storage management
Techniques for designing efficient algorithms; analysis of algorithms; lower bound arguments; algorithms for sorting, selection, graphs, and string matching
Introduction to basic data mining techniques (such as association rules mining, cluster analysis, and classification methods) and their applications (such as Web data mining, biomedical data mining and security)
CSC 4993Senior Capstone ProjectRequired CSCSenior Capstone Project. A written and oral presentation of research results, original for students but not usually original in a larger sense under the supervision of an advisor. It is required course for ALL Computer science majors. It is designed to synthesize the skills mastered during the course of the program. The main focus of this requirement must be mathematics. All Capstone Experiences must be approved by the faculty advisor and must include oral presentation of the work done to the university or a committee selected by the faculty advisor
CSC 4998InternshipCSC General electiveProgram to combine academic training with professional experience through short-term internships
IUGB General, BSS & SS electiveThe world?s economies have become much more integrated over time. This course is designed to introduce students to basic facts about the operation of the world economy, with particular focus on current issues confronting economies of various countries. The course will discuss the role of international organizations such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and will focus on major problems facing policy makers, such as global income inequality, financial crises, environmental challenges, the transition to a market economy, and the design of the European Monetary UnionNOTE: Not available for credit in the major; may be used as a non-major elective, depending on degree
ECON 2105Principles of MacroeconomicsIUGB, BBA & BSS core, General & SS electiveThis course analyzes the overall performance of economic systems including output and employment levels, inflation, economic growth, international finance, and the effects of monetary and fiscal policies
BBA core, General & SS electiveThis course is a systematic study of the functions of markets and prices in the production and distribution of goods and includes economic analysis of international trade, public finance, labor markets, monopoly, and poverty.

Required ECON, BSS electiveThis course applies the tools of aggregate economic analysis to the problems of the performance of the economy. The course links the theories and data to understand the causes of macroeconomic fluctuations in production, employment, inflation, and international economic relations; particular emphasis is placed on macroeconomic policy issues

A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
A composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.
A composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.
Historical survey of literature from the British Isles, with consideration of literary genres, conventions, and modes. Issues such as language change, periodization, canon formation, national identity, and the interrelationships between literature and other elements of culture.
BBA coreBSS Math core requirementThis is an introductory course in Financial Mathematics. The students will learn about the different types of interest (simple interest, discount interest, compound interest), annuities, debt retirement methods, investing in stocks and bonds. The topics expose the students to fundamental concepts such as cash flows, present value, future value, yield and probability that form the basis for further advanced learning
The main objective of this course is to understand how corporation make financial decisions and investment decisions. The course will first review time value of money which is a crucial concept in Finance. Students will learn about stocks and bonds valuations, the different types of institutions and their economic roles, investment strategies, and the links between risk and the cost of capital; we will cover techniques used to manage exposures. Further, students will learn about portfolios theories, strategic financial management and they will learn to use best practices to analyze projects (sensitivity analysis, monte carlo simulation and decision trees).
Introduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.
A thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.
Elementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics, basic probability, and distribution of random variables, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, regression and correlation, analysis of count data
College Algebra. Graphs; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and linear systems.
College Algebra. Graphs; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and linear systems.
Pre-Calculus. Trigonometric functions, identities, inverses, and equations; vectors; polar coordinates; conic sections.Prereq: Grade of C or higher in MATH 1111, a suitable score on the math placement test, or school approval
Calculus of One Variable I. Limits and Continuity, Differentiation, Mean Value Theorem for Derivatives; applications of differentiation; definition of the integral; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of integration to area
Calculus of One Variable II. Applications and techniques of integration; transcendental and trigonometric functions; polar coordinates; infinite sequences and series; indeterminate forms; improper integrals
Calculus III. Real valued functions of several variables, limits, continuity, differentials, directional derivatives, partial derivatives, chain rule, multiple integrals, applications
Introductory Linear Algebra. Theory and applications of matrix algebra and linear transformations. Topics include linear equations, vector spaces, matrices, subspaces, and bases
Same as CSc 2510Discrete Mathematics. Introduction to discrete structures which are applicable to computer science. Topics include number bases, logic, sets, Boolean algebra, and elementary concepts of graph theory
Advanced Math Approved CourseProbability and Statistics. Prerequisite: RMI 3750 or MATH 4751. CSP: 2. This course covers 1) uni-variate probability distributions, including binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, uniform, exponential, chi-square, beta, Pareto, lognormal, gamma, Weibull, and normal; 2) multivariate joint distributions, conditional and marginal distributions; 3) moments and moment generating function, 4) transform of variables, 5) order statistics, and 6) central limit theorem. The purpose of this course of reading is to develop knowledge of the fundamental probability tools for quantitatively assessing risk. The application of these tools to problems encountered in actuarial science is emphasized. A thorough command of probability topics and the supporting calculus is assumed.MATH 4751 or RMI 3750. CSP: 2
Advanced Math Approved CourseTheory of Interest. Prerequisite: Math 2215. CSP: 2. Topics include measurement of interest, accumulation and discount, forces of interest and discount, equations of value, annuities, perpetuities, amortization and sinking funds, yield rates, bonds and securities, depreciation, depletion, and capitalized costs.
Introduction to Operations Research. Linear programming, the Simplex method, network theory, game theory, Markov analysis, and other topics such as inventory analysis, queuing theory, integer programmingPrereq: MATH 3030 or MATH 2331 or higher
Modern Algebra I. Axiomatic approach to algebraic structures, groups, permutations, homomorphisms, and factor groups
Real Analysis I. The real number system, basic topology of metric spaces, sequences and series, limits and continuity
Senior Capstone Project. A written and oral presentation of research results, original for students but not usually original in a larger sense under the supervision of an advisor. It is required course for ALL mathematics majors. It is designed to synthesize the skills mastered during the course of the program. The main focus of this requirement must be mathematics. All Capstone Experiences must be approved by the faculty advisor and must include oral presentation of the work done to the university or a committee selected by the faculty advisor
MET Major requirementGeometric construction, mul3tiview, auxiliary views, section views, dimensioning. ANSI Y14 standards. Introduction to Computer-Aided Engineering. 3hours lecture, 2 hours labcomputer knowledge or consent of instructor
MET Major requirementSurvey of manufacturing processes. Application of machine tools, measuring tools, and primary processes to the manufacturing cycle. 3hours lecture, 2 hours labFreshman status
Static equilibrium conditions of forces, moments, friction, centroids, trusses, and moments of inertia.
Heat and energy conversions and properties of gases and liquids. First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and applications. Thermodynamic power cycles and applications.
Computer-aided drafting and design (CAD) systems and computer graphics hardware and software. Selection and evaluation of CAD systems.
This is an introductory management course that tries to help student to develop a basic understanding of management, its practices and its techniques. It also allows the student to become familiar with concepts and terminology that will be useful in many managerial situations. It aims not only to provide students with an introduction to contemporary administration concepts, it also encourages them to apply these concepts and methods to solve real world problems. In addition, the course covers ethics which will introduce students to the concept of social responsibility which is essential in managing business in the current environment.
This course provides a frame of reference for using models in support of decision making in an enterprise, then introduces some of the most commonly useful modeling approaches and principles. Topics covered include model components, simulation, optimization, time series and causal forecasting, decision analysis, Monte Carlo simulation, and quality management. The course emphasizes hands-on application of the techniques using commonly available software, and demonstrates the value of these approaches in a wide variety of functional settings
This course provides an overview of management in organizations. Students will be introduced to fundamental organizational concepts such as organizational systems, organization design and structure, and the decision making process. In addition, students will be introduced to the study of human behavior in organizations. The organizational behavior topics emphasized include team building, communication, leadership, motivation, ethics and social responsibility. The focus of the course is to examine, from a managerial perspective, the effect of individual, group, and organizational variables on organizational performance
Students critically evaluate the definition and meaning of leadership, developing their own interpretations and definitions of leadership after learning how others have interpreted and defined it. They also analyze their own leadership strengths and limitations and engage in activities to improve their leadership skills
BBA coreThis course integrates all the concepts and theory from the discipline studied and allows the student to produce an innovative piece of work. The specifics of the project are identified by the faculty advisor or professor teaching the course.Senior status and all all-3000 level management requirements. Last semester of senior year
Students are employed in the field of Marketing where they apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Professional development and obtaining specialized work experience are primary goals. A Marketing faculty member will monitor the student?s program with the student providing a formal written report at the end of the project. MKTG 3790 may be counted toward the minimum credit hours of marketing electives required for a marketing emphasis.Prereq: MKT 3010, plus 6 credit hours of Marketing electives and consent of supervising marketing instructor and area coordinator. BSS GPA > 2.5.
Selected moral issues, such as abortion, euthanasia, environmentalism, genetic engineering, feminism, animal rights, gay and lesbian rights, and political violence. Brief coverage of ethical theories as they relate to the issues at hand.
Fundamentals of analog and digital circuit design; discrete and integrated circuit devices; electronic instrumentation
American system of government covering the institutions and ideals basic to the American experience and the process by which the public participates in and is governed by these institutions and ideals
An introduction to international relations focusing on contemporary issues in world politics such as conflict and cooperation, business and trade, population, environment, and human rights. (Formerly POs 2401 Global Issues.)
Concepts and theories of international politics. Covers the evolution of the contemporary international system and conflict and cooperation among nation states
Study of the administrative principles and practices in the areas of organization, personnel management, budgeting, government regulation, and democratic controls (from PSC 206: Public Administration, UAB)
Same as SPCH 4540Explores the challenges of building stable political systems in the wake of civil war, using cases drawn from all regions of the world (from POLS 4215: Politics of Peace, GSU)
Interface between politics and the economy from a comparative perspective in both developed and developing nations of the world (from POLS 3330: Comparative Political Economy, UH)
Analysis of domestic policy in both advanced industrialized democracies and developing countries, looking at both policy process and policy substance. Attention will be given to the questions of how and why policies differ across countries, and how one might evaluate policy performance cross-nationally (adapted from PSC 443: Comparative Public Policy, UAB)

Special directed research. Paper required. By arrangement at student request, as approved by the department. May be repeated for credit (from POLS 4920: Directed Reading & Research, GSU)Advisor approval needed

Program to combine academic training with professional experience through short-term internships (from POLS 4940: Internships, GSU)Advisor approval needed
A broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing abnormal behavior, development, learning, memory, and personality.
Review of the ways in which mass mediation has transformed culture, politics, and communication. The purpose of the course is to enhance media literacy by assessing current debates over the role of the media in society.
Lectures, videos, and live theatre events to introduce non-theatre major to the basic elements of theatrical production, dramatic writing, and historical context of the art. Studio and/or shop work required
BSS & BBA corePrerequisites: noneIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

BSS & BBA corePrerequisites: noneIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

BSS & BBA corePrerequisites: noneIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

BSS & BBA corePrerequisites: ACCT 2101, minimum grade of CIn this course, students continue developing accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Students analyze information needed for financing and investing decisions and communicate alternatives and recommendations to stakeholders using spreadsheet and word processing software skills. Students evaluate operating outcomes using financial and non-financial performance measures appropriate in traditional and e-business environments

BSS & BBA corePrerequisites: ACCT 2101, minimum grade of CIn this course, students continue developing accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Students analyze information needed for financing and investing decisions and communicate alternatives and recommendations to stakeholders using spreadsheet and word processing software skills. Students evaluate operating outcomes using financial and non-financial performance measures appropriate in traditional and e-business environments

BSS electivePrerequisites: Grade of B or higher in both ACCT 2101, ACCT 2102.Students will learn the environmental and theoretical structure of financial accounting, the accounting process, and preparation of an income statement, balance sheet and statement of cash flows. They will also learn to measure income, do profitability analysis, apply time value of money concepts to financial accounting measurements, account for cash, receivables and inventories, and learn to research financial accounting issues
BSS electiveStudents will learn how to account for the economic resources and liabilities of an enterprise. Topics studied will include operational assets, investments, current liabilities, bonds, and leases. Students will also learn rudimentary financial statement analysis pertaining to these topics, analyze real world cases and learn to research financial accounting issues using the FASB Codification Database

BSS electivePrereq: ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102Students study what information managers need to plan, monitor and improve their critical processes, products and services. Emphasizing e-business environments, this course highlights the application of information technologies to tasks such as measuring cost to produce, market and deliver products and services, planning via budgets and cost-volume-profit analysis, implementing activity-based-management systems, and measuring and evaluating performance in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret and characterize implications of computations and communicate recommendations to stakeholders using databases, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

Required ACCTThis course provides insight into fund accounting and international public sector accounting standards. The course covers governmental funds, proprietary funds, and fiduciary funds. It reviews governmental financial reporting and examines the process of auditing governmental entities.
Required ACCTFocuses on the development and use of managerial accounting information in planning, control, and decision making activities and designing/implementing business strategies.

Survey of the sculpture, architecture, textiles, body ornament, and performance arts of Africa in terms of form, meaning, and function within society. Objects reintegrated into cultural contexts are examined in light of ?tradition? and social and political change.

IUGB core electivePrinciples of Biology I. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Introduction to scientific method, theory and experimentation, cell chemistry, enzymes, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week

IUGB core electivePrinciples of Biology I. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Introduction to scientific method, theory and experimentation, cell chemistry, enzymes, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week

IUGB core electivePrinciples of Biology I. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Introduction to scientific method, theory and experimentation, cell chemistry, enzymes, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week

Principles of Biology II. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Animal and plant biology with emphasis on structure, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week

Principles of Biology II. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Animal and plant biology with emphasis on structure, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week

Principles of Biology II. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Animal and plant biology with emphasis on structure, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week
This course introduces students to the functions of modern business. It shows the student how these functions exist in a changing society and the type of decisions which must be made within that environment. The course is also designed to expose students to the multitude of career fields in the areas of business. The importance of business in the modern society is also stressed throughout the course. Topics such as business environment, management, organization, marketing, finance, accounting, and data processing are discussed in an introductory manner. May not be taken to satisfy requirements for B.B.A. degree after junior standing has been attained without advance permission of instructor and dean.

BBA coreThis course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law, ethics, and business. The course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate.

BBA coreThis course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law, ethics, and business. The course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate.

BSS core electiveThis course examines worldwide integration of economic, political, technological, cultural, and social facets to explore the impact of globalization on organizations and individuals worldwide. Students develop a worldview of the global marketplace. They learn how to incorporate their knowledge and understanding of global markets through the simultaneous consideration of all business functions. Analytical frameworks such as SWOT are used to conduct firm and industry analyses. Special consideration is given to key issues in e-business that affect trends in international business.

One semester of prearranged work in Department of Management, Marketing and General Business operational activities in a designated enterprise cooperating with the School of BSS. Students will obtain comprehensive work experience and be responsible for periodic reports and appraisals as required by the instructor. No class hours are to be met; conferences are arranged.

This course prepares students who need to pursue their studies in an English instructional environment. It gives the opportunity to learners to be familiar with the academic settings and topics of English-speaking countries, to improve their fluency and help them develop key skills for University life, integrating different academic English skills: practice reading, speaking, listening, writing, vocabulary building and grammar.

This course prepares students who need to pursue their studies in an English instructional environment. It gives the opportunity to learners to be familiar with the academic settings and topics of English-speaking countries, to improve their fluency and help them develop key skills for University life, integrating different academic English skills: practice reading, speaking, listening, writing, vocabulary building and grammar.
A customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups
A customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups
A customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups

A customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups

A customized Intensive French Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their French proficiency. The course will focus on improving vocabulary building, grammar, reading, listening, writing and communicative skills.
A customized Intensive French Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their French proficiency. The course will focus on improving vocabulary building, grammar, reading, listening, writing and communicative skills.
This course is a level appropriate course for medical staff members who are interested in improving their English skills, combining a general English course with English for medical use. The course focuses on medical vocabulary building, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Practical tasks-based lessons with an emphasis on real life situations are emphasized as well.

Preparation for the internet-based TOEFL exam offered by the Educational Testing Service. The preparation course is based on the development of all language areas including the four language skills: Reading, Listening, Speaking and Writing, and Grammar and Vocabulary building to improve the test-takers? scores.

Principles of Chemistry I. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or the equivalent and authorization by department. Math 1113 as a prerequisite or co-requisite is strongly advised. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. First course in a two semesters sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

Principles of Chemistry I. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or the equivalent and authorization by department. Math 1113 as a prerequisite or co-requisite is strongly advised. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. First course in a two semesters sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.
Principles of Chemistry II. Prerequisite: Chem 1211 with grade of D or higher. (Grade of C or higher required for all Chemistry majors.) Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Second course in a two semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

This course provides an introduction to computer and information systems concepts, including hardware, software, databases, data communications, and business applications. The student is introduced to methods of determining user requirements and developing application systems using databases and fourth generation languages.

This course provides an introduction to computer and information systems concepts, including hardware, software, databases, data communications, and business applications. The student is introduced to methods of determining user requirements and developing application systems using databases and fourth generation languages.

This course provides an introduction to computer and information systems concepts, including hardware, software, databases, data communications, and business applications. The student is introduced to methods of determining user requirements and developing application systems using databases and fourth generation languages.
This course examines the defining characteristics of IT projects, especially involving the development of software intensive systems, and introduces the student to a variety of project management techniques that can be applied in an IT project context. This course will give students an understanding of the most common processes, tools, techniques, and theories that are necessary to manage IT projects. Managing IT projects that follow both plan-driven traditional development methods as well as agile methods will be covered
This course addresses the many management issues unique to the information services function within organizations. Coverage includes information systems planning, managing the information system infrastructure, justifying the information technology investments, the costing of services and networks, evaluating information system performance, alternative information system delivery modes, managing distributed and end user computing project and operations management, systems security, and the management of information system professionals.
This course addresses the many management issues unique to the information services function within organizations. Coverage includes information systems planning, managing the information system infrastructure, justifying the information technology investments, the costing of services and networks, evaluating information system performance, alternative information system delivery modes, managing distributed and end user computing project and operations management, systems security, and the management of information system professionals.
The course Database Management Systems provides an introduction to the management of database systems. The course emphasizes the understanding of the fundamentals of relational systems including data models, database architectures, and database manipulations. The course also provides an understanding of new developments and trends such as Internet database environment and data warehousing. The course uses a problem-based approach to learning.
Use of Web development tools for Web site development. Architectural planning, technology selection, and Web site programming tasks. Internet applications using COM components on both the client and server.
Enterprise information technology infrastructure including networking and telecommunications fundamentals, concepts, models, architectures, protocols, standards, communications, configuration, implementation, management, deployment software, firmware, hardware, distributed systems, file services, and software/hardware/network security issues
This course covers topics of knowledge management and business intelligence from an organizational IT perspective. The content of the course includes discussion of and readings on the nature of knowledge; knowledge discovery, generation, capture, transfer, sharing, and application; and includes discussion of the core IT capabilities necessary to deliver Business Intelligence in organizations. The development and use of data warehouses and data marts to support business analytics is discussed
Advanced n-tier client/server application development for an enterprise-wide setting
AKA CIS 4980This course provides the student with an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the core courses to larger and more complex problems and to gain experience in working as part of a teamPrerequisites: MATH 1070, MGS 3100, FIN 3XXX Financial Mathematics, MKT 3010, all required CIS 3000 level, 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours
Prereq: Junior or senior status and approval of Associate Dean and/or Faculty AdvisorThis course allows the student to work in industry or an agency and be mentored by an industry coach. A faculty member will supervise the internship and develop specific learning objectives that relate to the student?s goals, industry involved and the needs requirements for academic rigor.It is a supervised practicum.

Prereq: MATH 1111 or high school Algebra IIComputers and Applications. History of computers, hardware components, operating systems, application software, data communication. This course covers all of the IUGB Computer Skills course prerequisites.

Prereq: MATH 1111 or high school Algebra IIComputers and Applications. History of computers, hardware components, operating systems, application software, data communication. This course covers all of the IUGB Computer Skills course prerequisites.

Prereq: MATH 1111 or high school Algebra IIComputers and Applications. History of computers, hardware components, operating systems, application software, data communication. This course covers all of the IUGB Computer Skills course prerequisites.

Prereq: Grade of C or higher in CSC 1010 or instructor consent.An introduction to the discipline of computer science. Topics include algorithmic foundations, hardware concepts, virtual machine concepts, software systems, applications, and social issues.

Fundamental principles of computer programming. Expressions, procedures, variable types, data, input/output. Emphasis on structure and clarity as well as correctness

Computer structure and machine language, addressing techniques, macros, file I/O, program segmentation, and linkage

An introduction to programming at the level of the operating system. Topics include editors, system calls, programming tools, files, processes, inter-process communication, and shells

Basic concepts and analysis of data representation and associated algorithms, including linearly-linked lists, multi-linked structures, trees, searching, and sorting

Computer Architecture. Logic design, combinatorial and sequential circuits, input-output devices, memory, processors, controllers, parallel architectures, bit-slicing, reduced instruction sets
Computer Networks. Introduction to computer networks; details of layered network protocols with emphasis on functionality and analysis. Principles of relevant state-of-the-art network standards
Techniques used in large scale scientific or technical software development, including requirements analysis, specification, systems design, implementation, testing, validation, verification, and maintenance.

The course introduces the student to programming techniques required to develop Web applications. Topics include: HTML forms, JavaScript, Servlets and Java Server Pages, PHP and MySQL, Web access to Oracle databases, and XML

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles that underlie the relational model of data. Topics include formal query languages; SQL; query optimization; relational database design theory; physical database design, integrity, security, and concurrency control

Data visualization is about displaying data in visual forms such as charts, diagrams, or 3D models. This course is targeted towards students who are interested in using data visualization in their work as well as those who are interested in developing visualization systems. Topics include the theoretical basis (e.g. Gestalt theory, visual attention, visual complexity theories), visualization techniques (e.g. interactive maps, time series charts, scatter plot maps, trees, networks, graphs, etc.), and visualization tools (e.g. Google Chart Tools, Processing). Students will learn basic visualization principles, how to choose the right kind of display for specific purposes, and how to provide interactive features for the user interfacePrereq: Computer Science majors: CSC 2310 with grade of C or higher; All other majors: consent of instructor
Introduction to basic data mining techniques (such as association rules mining, cluster analysis, and classification methods) and their applications (such as Web data mining, biomedical data mining and security)

CSC 4993Senior Capstone ProjectRequired CSCSenior Capstone Project. A written and oral presentation of research results, original for students but not usually original in a larger sense under the supervision of an advisor. It is required course for ALL Computer science majors. It is designed to synthesize the skills mastered during the course of the program. The main focus of this requirement must be mathematics. All Capstone Experiences must be approved by the faculty advisor and must include oral presentation of the work done to the university or a committee selected by the faculty advisor

CSC 4998InternshipCSC General electiveProgram to combine academic training with professional experience through short-term internships

IUGB General, BSS & SS electiveThe world?s economies have become much more integrated over time. This course is designed to introduce students to basic facts about the operation of the world economy, with particular focus on current issues confronting economies of various countries. The course will discuss the role of international organizations such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and will focus on major problems facing policy makers, such as global income inequality, financial crises, environmental challenges, the transition to a market economy, and the design of the European Monetary UnionNOTE: Not available for credit in the major; may be used as a non-major elective, depending on degree

ECON 2105Principles of MacroeconomicsIUGB, BBA & BSS core, General & SS electiveThis course analyzes the overall performance of economic systems including output and employment levels, inflation, economic growth, international finance, and the effects of monetary and fiscal policies

ECON 2105Principles of MacroeconomicsIUGB, BBA & BSS core, General & SS electiveThis course analyzes the overall performance of economic systems including output and employment levels, inflation, economic growth, international finance, and the effects of monetary and fiscal policies

BBA core, General & SS electiveThis course is a systematic study of the functions of markets and prices in the production and distribution of goods and includes economic analysis of international trade, public finance, labor markets, monopoly, and poverty.

BBA core, General & SS elective. This course is a systematic study of the functions of markets and prices in the production and distribution of goods and includes economic analysis of international trade, public finance, labor markets, monopoly, and poverty.

Required ECON, BSS electiveThis course applies the tools of aggregate economic analysis to the problems of the performance of the economy. The course links the theories and data to understand the causes of macroeconomic fluctuations in production, employment, inflation, and international economic relations; particular emphasis is placed on macroeconomic policy issues

Required ECON, BSS electiveThis course develops models of the behaviour of individual economic units, including consumers, workers, investors, and business firms, and explains how and why these units make economic decisions. Economic behavior in various types of market environments is analyzed. The implications of this behavior for the allocation of resources and for public policy are discussed

ECON electiveThis course analyzes resource allocation issues in the health care sector of the U.S. and other economies. The demand, production, cost, and financing of health care services are examined using a variety of conceptual and empirical models. The economic evaluation of alternative health care programs is also discussed.
ECON electiveThis course provides an introduction to the ways that economics can be used to understand cities. The primary emphasis in the first half of the course is on the spatial organization of economic activity. Why are cities located where they are, what economic functions do they perform, and, within cities, how can we understand what goes on where, and who lives where. The tools that we develop as we deal with these questions will be essential in the second half of the course, in which we will take an economic approach to a number of policy issues that are loosely termed "urban problems" in the popular press.
ECON electiveThis course explores issues related to expenditure and tax policies of governments, as well as views regarding the purpose of government and criteria for evaluating government actions. Various government expenditure programs, such as education and social security, and revenue sources, such as income taxes and property taxes, are then described and analyzed in light of the criteria. The course also includes a discussion of how group or collective choices are made within society, how environmental policies affect the level of pollution, and the importance of public debt.
ECON electiveThe theory of government regulatory and antitrust policies and their effects on the competitive performance of the economy and the behavior of individual firms and industries. Specific topics include an economic and some legal analysis of mergers, price discrimination, predatory strategies, tying contracts, resale price maintenance, cost-benefit studies, product and worker safety, the environment, and deregulation issues in telecommunications, transportation, and other industries, with special emphasis on modern landmark cases and the role of economics in affecting public policy.
ECON 4620Economic Development of AfricaECON electiveEconomic and social problems of raising standards of living in Africa. Discussion issues include economic growth, growth and the environment, income disparities, the role of trade and foreign investment and the accompanying political and social changes
An examination of theories of trade and empirical verification, trade and welfare, tariff and no tariff barriers to trade, common markets, and the relationship between growth and trade

A study of the foreign exchange market, the balance of payments, and exchange rate systems, with particular emphasis on the current international monetary system, the international macroeconomic model, and policies for internal and external balance

An introduction to the regression model, its assumptions, limitations, and application to problems in business and economics

A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7

A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7

A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7

A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
A composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
A composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.
A composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.

A composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.

A composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.

ENG 2101 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.

ENG 2101 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.

Historical survey of literature from the British Isles, with consideration of literary genres, conventions, and modes. Issues such as language change, periodization, canon formation, national identity, and the interrelationships between literature and other elements of culture.
Historical survey of literature from the United States, with consideration of literary genres, conventions, and modes. Issues such as periodization, canon formation, national identity, and the interrelationships between literature and other elements of culture.Engl 1102 >= C, or Eng 1101 with an A, or equivalentCSP 6

The main objective of this course is to understand how corporation make financial decisions and investment decisions. The course will first review time value of money which is a crucial concept in Finance. Students will learn about stocks and bonds valuations, the different types of institutions and their economic roles, investment strategies, and the links between risk and the cost of capital; we will cover techniques used to manage exposures. Further, students will learn about portfolios theories, strategic financial management and they will learn to use best practices to analyze projects (sensitivity analysis, monte carlo simulation and decision trees).

This course is a follow up of Fundamentals of Valuations I. The topics discussed include: risk-return analysis, the efficient market hypothesis, derivatives analysis and pricing, and the economics of the foreign exchange markets. This is a highly quantitative course and students are expected to be comfortable with basic finance a probability, statistics, regression analysis, and spreadsheet programming
This course is a follow up of Fundamentals of Valuations I. The topics discussed include: risk-return analysis, the efficient market hypothesis, derivatives analysis and pricing, and the economics of the foreign exchange markets. This is a highly quantitative course and students are expected to be comfortable with basic finance a probability, statistics, regression analysis, and spreadsheet programming.
Students intensively examine financial statements and business characteristics to learn the information content of financial statements. Applications focus on how they can be used to identify the pattern of funds need for a business and the best financing vehicle to meet that need. The primary tools of analysis are financial statement construction, cash flow statements, financial ratios, common sized statements, cash budgets, Performa statements, sustainable growth rates, and cost volume profit analysis. Students evaluate the needs of a variety of companies that differ with respect to type, industry, profitability, growth, seasonality, cyclicality, and degree of distress. The primary teaching method is case analysis, and a significant course objective is development of communication skills
This course exposes students to foreign exchange risk and develops their understanding of institutional realities encountered by the financial manager in a global economic environment. Activities of currency arbitrage, hedging, and speculation are examined in light of exchange rate regimes, eurocurrency markets, the balance of payments, mechanics of foreign exchange conditions in international finance, and international trade activities.
This course develops a framework for analyzing corporate investment and financial decisions facing financial managers and introduces students to the tools to make such decisions. Students are introduced to the central issues in capital structure and dividend policy decisions and the interaction between financing and investment decisions. Techniques are introduced for evaluating strategic investments in technology, mergers and acquisitions, corporate restructurings and research and development. They also form the basis for the valuation of firms in traditional and new-technology industries and security offerings such as initial public offerings. A variety of pedagogical vehicles are used including problem solving, case studies, lectures, and group projects
This course examines the major financial management issues confronting depository financial service firms (commercial banks and bank holding companies, savings organizations, credit unions). Specific topics include the economics of intermediation; forces affecting change; legal/regulatory influences; profitability analysis; and management of various risk areas such as interest rate risk, liquidity risk, and capital management. One area not covered is loan analysis since the topic is treated in great depth in FIN 4020.
Development of basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing; acquisition of grammatical structures. Not open to native speakers of French
Continuing development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Vocabulary expansion. Further work with grammatical structures.
An introduction to French literature within its cultural context. The major periods of French literature are presented, as well as current literary trends. Types of literature and the cultural forces that influenced the authors. Extensive reading. Taught in French.
Introduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.

Introduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.

Introduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.

Introduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.
A thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.
A thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.

A thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.

Elementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics, basic probability, and distribution of random variables, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, regression and correlation, analysis of count data

Elementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics, basic probability, and distribution of random variables, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, regression and correlation, analysis of count data