Available courses

Non-degree program50 totalThis course is a level appropriate course for medical staff members who are interested in improving their English skills, combining a general English course with English for medical use. The course focuses on medical vocabulary building, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Practical tasks-based lessons with an emphasis on real life situations are emphasized as well.
Non-degree program50 totalA customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their English proficiency.

BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students begin to develop accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Some of the problems include evaluating business projects and process changes, predicting and reporting operating results, and managing business risks. The course concentrates on planning, decision making, and communicating operating results in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret the meaning and characterize the implications of computations for a variety of business products, distribution channels and constraints, and then communicate viewpoints and recommendations to stakeholders using database, spreadsheet, and word processing skills

BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students continue developing accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Students analyze information needed for financing and investing decisions and communicate alternatives and recommendations to stakeholders using spreadsheet and word processing software skills. Students evaluate operating outcomes using financial and non-financial performance measures appropriate in traditional and e-business environmentsPrereq: ACT 2301 or ACCT 2101, minimum grade of C
BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students continue developing accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Students analyze information needed for financing and investing decisions and communicate alternatives and recommendations to stakeholders using spreadsheet and word processing software skills. Students evaluate operating outcomes using financial and non-financial performance measures appropriate in traditional and e-business environmentsPrereq: ACT 2301 or ACCT 2101, minimum grade of C
BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students continue developing accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Students analyze information needed for financing and investing decisions and communicate alternatives and recommendations to stakeholders using spreadsheet and word processing software skills. Students evaluate operating outcomes using financial and non-financial performance measures appropriate in traditional and e-business environmentsPrereq: ACT 2301 or ACCT 2101, minimum grade of C
BSS & BBA coreIn this course, students continue developing accounting skills for solving business problems, individually and collaboratively. Students analyze information needed for financing and investing decisions and communicate alternatives and recommendations to stakeholders using spreadsheet and word processing software skills. Students evaluate operating outcomes using financial and non-financial performance measures appropriate in traditional and e-business environmentsPrereq: ACT 2301 or ACCT 2101, minimum grade of C

ACT 4301ACCT 4111Intermediate Accounting IBSS electiveStudents will learn the environmental and theoretical structure of financial accounting, the accounting process, and preparation of an income statement, balance sheet and statement of cash flows. They will also learn to measure income, do profitability analysis, apply time value of money concepts to financial accounting measurements, account for cash, receivables and inventories, and learn to research financial accounting issues.Prereq: Grade of B or higher in ACT 2301 or ACCT 2101 and ACT 2302 or ACCT 2102. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours

ACT 4302ACCT 4112Intermediate Accounting IIBSS electiveStudents will learn how to account for the economic resources and liabilities of an enterprise. Topics studied will include operational assets, investments, current liabilities, bonds, and leases. Students will also learn rudimentary financial statement analysis pertaining to these topics, analyze real world cases and learn to research financial accounting issues using the FASB Codification Database.Prereq: Grade of C or higher in Act 4301 or ACCT 4111. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours.
ACT 4310ACCT 4210Cost/Managerial AccountingBSS electiveStudents study what information managers need to plan, monitor and improve their critical processes, products and services. Emphasizing e-business environments, this course highlights the application of information technologies to tasks such as measuring cost to produce market and deliver products and services, planning via budgets and cost-volume-profit analysis, implementing activity-based-management systems, and measuring and evaluating performance in traditional and e-business settings. Students interpret and characterize implications of computations and communicate recommendations to stakeholders using databases, spreadsheet, and word processing skills.Prereq: ACT 2301 or ACCT 2101 and ACT 2302 or ACCT 2102
ACT 4360ACCT 4600AuditingRequired ACTThe object of this course is to teach students the procedures followed by CPAs in evaluating and examining the financial statements of entities under audit.Methods and techniques on evaluating an entity internal control system and how auditors? opinions are issued based on audit evidence.Prereq: ACT 4301 or ACCT 4111 and ACT 4302 or ACCT 4112 and ACT 4303 or ACCT 4410 and senior standing
ART 1302AH 1750Survey of Art IICore Hum & General electiveHistory of Western Art II: The Renaissance through Contemporary Art. Art of the Western world from the fourteenth century to the present.Prereq: SPH 1200 or SPCH 1000, Sophomore status, CSP 1, 6, 7
ARH 1303AH 1850Survey of Art IIIHum & General electiveArt of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Survey of the arts of the indigenous cultures of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Anthropological and multidisciplinary approach.Prereq: SPH 1200 or SPCH 1000, Sophomore status, CSP 1, 6, 7
ART 2305THEA 2040Introduction to the TheaterIUGB core electiveLectures, videos, and live theatre events to introduce non-theatre major to the basic elements of theatrical production, dramatic writing, and historical context of the art. Studio and/or shop work required.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,7
ART 2305THEA 2040Introduction to the TheaterIUGB core electiveLectures, videos, and live theatre events to introduce non-theatre major to the basic elements of theatrical production, dramatic writing, and historical context of the art. Studio and/or shop work required.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,7
ART 2305THEA 2040Introduction to the TheaterIUGB core electiveLectures, videos, and live theatre events to introduce non-theatre major to the basic elements of theatrical production, dramatic writing, and historical context of the art. Studio and/or shop work required.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,7
ASC 4310MTH 4330 = ACS 4330Theory of Interest Advanced Math Approved CourseTheory of Interest. Prerequisite: MATH 2415. CSP: 2. Topics include measurement of interest, accumulation and discount, forces of interest and discount, equations of value, annuities, perpetuities, amortization and sinking funds, yield rates, bonds and securities, depreciation, depletion, and capitalized costs.Prereq: MATH 2415, CSP: 2
ASC 4314ACS 4340 = MTH 4340Life Contingencies I Advanced Math Approved CourseLife Contingencies I. Prerequisite: MTH 4345, MTH 4230, CSP: 2. This course is an introduction to life contingencies as applied in actuarial practice. Topics include present value random variables for contingent annuities and insurance, their distributions and actuarial present values, equivalence principle, and other principles for determining premiums.Prereq: MTH 4345, MTH 4230, CSP: 2
BIO 1401BIOL 2107IUGB core electivePrinciples of Biology I. Introduction to scientific method, theory and experimentation, cell chemistry, enzymes, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a weekPrereq: Min of 15 Credits, CSP 1, 6, 7
BIO 1401BIOL 2107IUGB core electivePrinciples of Biology I. Introduction to scientific method, theory and experimentation, cell chemistry, enzymes, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a weekPrereq: Min of 15 Credits, CSP 1, 6, 7
BIO 1401BIOL 2107IUGB core electivePrinciples of Biology I. Introduction to scientific method, theory and experimentation, cell chemistry, enzymes, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a weekPrereq: Min of 15 Credits, CSP 1, 6, 7
BIO 1401BIOL 2107IUGB core electivePrinciples of Biology I. Introduction to scientific method, theory and experimentation, cell chemistry, enzymes, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Fulfills Biology Major requirement. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a weekPrereq: Min of 15 Credits, CSP 1, 6, 7
BUS 1301BUSA 1101Survey of BusinessSocial Science elective onlyThis course introduces students to the functions of modern business. It shows the student how these functions exist in a changing society and the type of decisions which must be made within that environment. The course is also designed to expose students to the multitude of career fields in the areas of business. The importance of business in the modern society is also stressed throughout the course. Topics such as business environment, management, organization, marketing, finance, accounting, and data processing are discussed in an introductory manner. May not be taken to satisfy requirements for B.B.A. degree after junior standing has been attained without advance permission of instructor and dean.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101
BUS 2305BUSA 2106Business LawBBA coreThis course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law, ethics, and business. The course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate.Prereq: University status
BUS 2305BUSA 2106Business LawBBA coreThis course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law, ethics, and business. The course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate.Prereq: University status
BUS 2305BUSA 2106Business LawBBA coreThis course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law, ethics, and business. The course also covers government regulation of business activities and the legal environment within which business must operate.Prereq: University status
BUS 3300BUSA 3000Globalization and Business PracticesBSS core electiveThis course examines worldwide integration of economic, political, technological, cultural, and social facets to explore the impact of globalization on organizations and individuals worldwide. Students develop a worldview of the global marketplace. They learn how to incorporate their knowledge and understanding of global markets through the simultaneous consideration of all business functions. Analytical frameworks such as SWOT are used to conduct firm and industry analyses. Special consideration is given to key issues in e-business that affect trends in international business.Prereq: Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours.

BUS 3301BUSA 3010Quantitative Methods for Business Management (ex Math 3010)BBA electiveIn today's competitive world, statistical analysis increasingly guides decision-making. Properly gathered data can provide invaluable insights in a business, whether your goal is to improve operational processes, increase revenues, direct new developments or retain valued customers. This course teaches statistical techniques for describing and measuring data, and it provides an overview of probability concepts. It will also explore standard sampling methods and hypothesis testing, linear regression, correlation, time series and forecasting.Prereq: MTH 1370 or MATH 1070

BUS 3320PHIL 3730Business EthicsBSS core, General & Hum electiveMoral issues in business, such as social responsibility, employee obligations and rights, ethics and the professions, marketing and advertising practices, and the environment. Issues in both domestic and international areas may be discussed.Prereq: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102 either >=C, CSP 1,6,7
BUS 4398BUSA 4998Internship / Field ExperienceBSS electiveOne semester of prearranged work in Department of Management, Marketing and General Business operational activities in a designated enterprise cooperating with the School of BSS. Students will obtain comprehensive work experience and be responsible for periodic reports and appraisals as required by the instructor. No class hours are to be met; conferences are arranged.Prereq: Junior standing and approval of department head.
A customized Intensive French Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their French proficiency. The course will focus on improving vocabulary building, grammar, reading, listening, writing and communicative skills.
Non-degree program50 totalA customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their English proficiency.
Non-degree program50 totalA customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their English proficiency.
Non-degree program50 totalA customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their English proficiency.
Non-degree program50 totalA customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their English proficiency.
Non-degree program50 totalA customized Intensive English Program for individuals or groups to cater to the varying needs of the participants and enhance their English proficiency.
Non-degree program50 totalPreparation for the internet-based TOEFL exam offered by the Educational Testing Service. The preparation course is based on the development of all language areas including the four language skills: Reading, Listening, Speaking and Writing, and Grammar and Vocabulary building to improve the test-takers? scores.

Non-degree program50 totalPreparation for the internet-based TOEFL exam offered by the Educational Testing Service. The preparation course is based on the development of all language areas including the four language skills: Reading, Listening, Speaking and Writing, and Grammar and Vocabulary building to improve the test-takers? scores.

CHE 1401CHEM 1211Principles of Chemistry IIUGB core electivePrinciples of Chemistry I. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or the equivalent and authorization by department. MTH 1303 or Math 1113 as a prerequisite or co-requisite is strongly advised. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. First course in a two semesters sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.Prereq: MTH 1303 or MATH 1113, CSP 1,2,6,7

CHE 1401CHEM 1211Principles of Chemistry IIUGB core electivePrinciples of Chemistry I. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or the equivalent and authorization by department. MTH 1303 or Math 1113 as a prerequisite or co-requisite is strongly advised. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. First course in a two semesters sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.Prereq: MTH 1303 or MATH 1113, CSP 1,2,6,7

CHE 1402CHEM 1212Principles of Chemistry IIIUGB core electivePrinciples of Chemistry II. Prerequisite: CHE 1401/CHEM 1211 with grade of D or higher. (Grade of C or higher required for all Chemistry majors.) Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Second course in a two semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.Prereq: CHE 1401 or CHEM 1211 either > D, CSP 1,2,6,7

CIS 2301CIS 2010Introduction to Computer-based Information SystemsBSS core electiveThis course provides an introduction to computer and information systems concepts, including hardware, software, databases, data communications, and business applications. The student is introduced to methods of determining user requirements and developing application systems using databases and fourth generation languages.Prereq: University status

CIS 2301CIS 2010Introduction to Computer-based Information SystemsBSS core electiveThis course provides an introduction to computer and information systems concepts, including hardware, software, databases, data communications, and business applications. The student is introduced to methods of determining user requirements and developing application systems using databases and fourth generation languages.Prereq: University status
CIS 3301CIS 3001Managing Information Technology ProjectsRequired CISThis course examines the defining characteristics of IT projects, especially involving the development of software intensive systems, and introduces the student to a variety of project management techniques that can be applied in an IT project context. This course will give students an understanding of the most common processes, tools, techniques, and theories that are necessary to manage IT projects. Managing IT projects that follow both plan-driven traditional development methods as well as agile methods will be covered.Prereq: CIS 2301 or CIS 2010
CIS 3315CIS 3320Telecommunication for BusinessRequired CISThis course introduces the subject of computer networks and the use of computer networks in business applications. Topics covered include client server networks, network hardware and software, distributed computing, key issues in network management, and the fundamentals of data communications.Prereq: CIS 2301 or CIS 2010, GPA 2.5 and 45 semester Hours
CIS 3322CIS 3640Management of Information ServicesRequired CISThis course addresses the many management issues unique to the information services function within organizations. Coverage includes information systems planning, managing the information system infrastructure, justifying the information technology investments, the costing of services and networks, evaluating information system performance, alternative information system delivery modes, managing distributed and end user computing project and operations management, systems security, and the management of information system professionals.Prereq: 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours or approval by professor
COM 1300SPCH 1000Human CommunicationHumanities electiveAn introduction to human communication, including language development, verbal, nonverbal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, public, and intercultural communication.Prereq: Freshman status
COM 2301ENGL 2101Technical CommunicationRequired IUGB coreCOM 2301 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101, CSP 1,6,7
COM 2301ENGL 2101Technical CommunicationRequired IUGB coreCOM 2301 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101, CSP 1,6,7
COM 2301ENGL 2101Technical CommunicationRequired IUGB coreCOM 2301 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101, CSP 1,6,7
COM 2301ENGL 2101Technical CommunicationRequired IUGB coreCOM 2301 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101, CSP 1,6,7
COM 2305COM 2350SPCH 2050Media, Culture, and SocietySocial Science electiveReview of the ways in which mass mediation has transformed culture, politics, and communication. The purpose of the course is to enhance media literacy by assessing current debates over the role of the media in society. Formerly SPCH 2050.Prereq: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102 either >=C, CSP 1,6,7
Prereq: MATH 1111 or high school Algebra IIComputers and Applications. History of computers, hardware components, operating systems, application software, data communication. This course covers all of the IUGB Computer Skills course prerequisites.
Prereq: MATH 1111 or high school Algebra IIComputers and Applications. History of computers, hardware components, operating systems, application software, data communication. This course covers all of the IUGB Computer Skills course prerequisites.
Prereq: MATH 1111 or high school Algebra IIComputers and Applications. History of computers, hardware components, operating systems, application software, data communication. This course covers all of the IUGB Computer Skills course prerequisites.
CSC 2300CSC 2010Introduction to Computer Science= Principles of Computer ScienceRequired STEMAn introduction to the discipline of computer science. Topics include algorithmic foundations, hardware concepts, virtual machine concepts, software systems, applications, and social issues.Prereq: Grade of C or higher in CSC 1310 or CSC 1010 or Instructor consent
CSC 2301CSC 2310Principles of Computer ProgrammingRequired STEMFundamental principles of computer programming. Expressions, procedures, variable types, data, input/output. Emphasis on structure and clarity as well as correctness.Prereq: CSC 2300 or CSC 2010 with grade of C or higher.
CSC 3300CSC 3310CSC 3210Computer Org & ProgrammingRequired CSCComputer structure and machine language, addressing techniques, macros, file I/O, program segmentation, and linkage. Formerly CSC 3210.Prereq: CSC 2313 or CSC 2310 and CSC 2315 or CSC 2510 or MTH 2320 or Math 2420 with grades of C or higher
CSC 3301CSC 3321Operating Systems and NetworkingCSC Major Requirement 16/17Prerequisite: CSC 2310 with grade of C or higher CSC 3320 Operating Systems and Networking - Operating systems design and implementation. Topics include overview of components of an operating system, mutual exclusion and synchronization, implementation of processes, scheduling algorithms, memory management, and file systems. Net-centric computing, network architectures; issues associated with distributed computing. Lectures and mandatory one hour lab session per week. This course replaces (CSC 3320 SYSTEM-LEVEL PROGRAMMING in the CSC Major Requirements)? class hours 1 lab hour.Prerequisite: CSC 2310 with grade of C
CSC 3302CSC 3340CSC 3410Data StructuresRequired CSCBasic concepts and analysis of data representation and associated algorithms, including linearly-linked lists, multi-linked structures, trees, searching, and sorting. Formerly CSC 3410.Prereq: CSC 2313 or CSC 2310, and MTH 2411 or Math 2211, and CSC 2315 or CSC 2510 or MTH 2320 or Math 2420 with grades of C or higher
CSC 4300CSC 4312CSC 4210Computer ArchitectureRequired CSCComputer Architecture. Logic design, combinatorial and sequential circuits, input-output devices, memory, processors, controllers, parallel architectures, bit-slicing, reduced instruction sets. Formerly CSC 4210.Prereq: CSC 3310 or CSC 3210 with grade of C or higher
CSC 4302CSC 4221Wireless Networks Administration = ? CSC 4321CSC Major Requirement 16/17CSC 4221 - WIRELESS NETWORKS ADMINISTRATION 3.0Prerequisite: CSC 4220 with grade of C or higher, or consent of instructor. Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing. Introduction to wireless communication networks and mobile computing. Topics include: wireless communications technology; communication protocols in wireless networks; representative network types such as cellular wireless networks, wireless LANs, wireless ad hoc networks and wireless sensor networks, and mobile communication systems. This course replaces CSC 4220 COMPUTER NETWORKS in the CSC Major Requirements.Prerequisite: CSC 3301 (CSC 3321) with grade of C or higher, or consent of instructor
CSC 4303CSC 4330CSC 4330Programming Language ConceptsRequired CSCFundamental programming language concepts, including syntax versus semantics, binding time, scopes, and storage management. Formerly CSC 4330.Prereq: CSC 3310 or CSC 3210 and CSC 3340 or CSC 3410 with grades of C or higher

CSC 4305CSC 4350CSC 4350Software EngineeringRequired CSCTechniques used in large scale scientific or technical software development, including requirements analysis, specification, systems design, implementation, testing, validation, verification, and maintenance. Formerly CSC 4350.Prereq: CSC 3340 or CSC 3410 with grade of C or higher

CSC 4307CSC 4317CSC 4710Database SystemsRequired CSC Database concentrationAn introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles that underlie the relational model of data. Topics include formal query languages; SQL; query optimization; relational database design theory; physical database design, integrity, security, and concurrency control. Formerly CSC 4710.Prereq: CSC 3340 or CSC 3410 with grade of C or higher

CSC 4311CSC 4340CSC 4740Data MiningRequired CSC Database concentrationIntroduction to basic data mining techniques (such as association rules mining, cluster analysis, and classification methods) and their applications (such as Web data mining, biomedical data mining and security). Formerly CSC 4740.Prereq: CSC 3340 or CSC 3410 with grade of C or higher

CSC 4333CSC 4398CSC 4998InternshipRequired CSCProgram to combine academic training with professional experience through short-term internships. Formerly CSC 4998.Prereq: Junior or Senior Status and Faculty Advisor Approval
ECO 2300ECON 2100The Global EconomyIUGB General, BBA & SS electiveThe world?s economies have become much more integrated over time. This course is designed to introduce students to basic facts about the operation of the world economy, with particular focus on current issues confronting economies of various countries. The course will discuss the role of international organizations such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and will focus on major problems facing policy makers, such as global income inequality, financial crises, environmental challenges, the transition to a market economy, and the design of the European Monetary UnionNOTE: Not available for credit in the major; may be used as a non-major elective, depending on degreePrereq: University status

ECO 2301ECON 2105Principles of MacroeconomicsIUGB, BBA & BSS core, General & SS electiveThis course analyzes the overall performance of economic systems including output and employment levels, inflation, economic growth, international finance, and the effects of monetary and fiscal policies.Prereq: MTH 1301 or MATH 1111

ECO 2301ECON 2105Principles of MacroeconomicsIUGB, BBA & BSS core, General & SS electiveThis course analyzes the overall performance of economic systems including output and employment levels, inflation, economic growth, international finance, and the effects of monetary and fiscal policies.Prereq: MTH 1301 or MATH 1111
ECN 2302ECON 2106Principles of MicroeconomicsBBA core, General & SS electiveThis course is a systematic study of the functions of markets and prices in the production and distribution of goods and includes economic analysis of international trade, public finance, labor markets, monopoly, and poverty.Prereq: MTH 1301 or MATH 1111
ECN 2302ECON 2106Principles of MicroeconomicsBBA core, General & SS electiveThis course is a systematic study of the functions of markets and prices in the production and distribution of goods and includes economic analysis of international trade, public finance, labor markets, monopoly, and poverty.Prereq: MTH 1301 or MATH 1111

ECO 3301ECON 3900Intermediate MacroeconomicsRequired ECO minor, BBA electiveThis course applies the tools of aggregate economic analysis to the problems of the performance of the economy. The course links the theories and data to understand the causes of macroeconomic fluctuations in production, employment, inflation, and international economic relations; particular emphasis is placed on macroeconomic policy issues.Prereq: ECO 2301 or ECON 2105

ECN 3302ECON 3910Intermediate MicroeconomicsRequired ECO minor, BBA electiveThis course develops models of the behaviour of individual economic units, including consumers, workers, investors, and business firms, and explains how and why these units make economic decisions. Economic behavior in various types of market environments is analyzed. The implications of this behavior for the allocation of resources and for public policy are discussed.Prereq: ECO 2302 or ECON 2106
ECO 4326ECO 4356ECON 4600Economic DevelopmentRequired ECO minor, BBA electiveThis course analyzes the issues underlying vast differences in development among the nations of the world. Economic growth, subject to appropriate restraints on environmental degradation, is seen as a major instrument for improving the development of nations and the welfare of their people. The course employs elements of theories of growth, international trade and finance, industrial organization, money, as well as micro and macroeconomics to analyze causes of and prescribe cures for, underdevelopment. Formerly ECON 4600Prereq: ECO 2305 or ECON 2105 and ECO 2306 or ECON 2106
ECO 4335ECON 4800International TradeBBA electiveAn examination of theories of trade and empirical verification, trade and welfare, tariff and no tariff barriers to trade, common markets, and the relationship between growth and trade.Prereq: ECO 2302 or ECON 2106
ECN 4345ECON 4950Econometrics and ApplicationsRequired ECO minor, BBA electiveAn introduction to the regression model, its assumptions, limitations, and application to problems in business and economics.Prereq: ECO 2301 or ECON 2105 and ECO 2302 or ECON 2106 and MTH 1370 or MATH 1070
ENG 1301ENGL 1101English Composition 1Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
ENG 1301ENGL 1101English Composition 1Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
ENG 1301ENGL 1101English Composition 1Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
ENG 1301ENGL 1101English Composition 1Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to increase the student?s ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7

ENG 1301ENGL 1101 English Composition 1 Required IUGB core A composition course designed to increase the students' ability to construct written prose of various kinds. Focuses on methods of organization, analysis, research skills, and the production of short argumentative and expository essays; readings consider issues of contemporary social and cultural concern. Passing grade is C.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7

ENG 1302ENGL 1102English Composition 2Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENG 1301/ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either >= C, CSP 1,2,3,6,7
ENG 1302ENGL 1102English Composition 2Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENG 1301/ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either >= C, CSP 1,2,3,6,7
ENG 1302ENGL 1102English Composition 2Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENG 1301/ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either >= C, CSP 1,2,3,6,7
ENG 1302ENGL 1102English Composition 2Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENG 1301/ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either >= C, CSP 1,2,3,6,7
ENG 1302ENGL 1102English Composition 2Required IUGB coreA composition course designed to develop writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENG 1301/ENGL 1101. Stresses critical reading and writing and incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods; readings will be drawn from a wide variety of literature texts. Passing grade is C.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either >= C, CSP 1,2,3,6,7
FIN 3305FIN 3300Corporate FinanceRequired BBAThe main objective of this course is to understand how corporation make financial decisions and investment decisions. The course will first review time value of money which is a crucial concept in Finance. Students will learn about stocks and bonds valuations, the different types of institutions and their economic roles, investment strategies, and the links between risk and the cost of capital; we will cover techniques used to manage exposures. Further, students will learn about portfolios theories, strategic financial management and they will learn to use best practices to analyze projects (sensitivity analysis, monte carlo simulation and decision trees).Prereq: FIN 3311or FIN 3011 (Financial Mathematics)
FIN 4301FIN 4001Fundamentals of Valuation IRequired Finance minor, BBA electiveThis course is a follow up of Fundamentals of Valuations I. The topics discussed include: risk-return analysis, the efficient market hypothesis, derivatives analysis and pricing, and the economics of the foreign exchange markets. This is a highly quantitative course and students are expected to be comfortable with basic finance a probability, statistics, regression analysis, and spreadsheet programming.Prereq: FIN 3300 or FIN 3300 and MTH 1370 or MATH 1070 and BUS 3350 or BCOM 3950, CSP 1,2,6
FIN 4302FIN 4002Fundamentals of Valuation IIRequired Finance minor, BBA electiveThis course is a follow up of Fundamentals of Valuations I. The topics discussed include: risk-return analysis, the efficient market hypothesis, derivatives analysis and pricing, and the economics of the foreign exchange markets. This is a highly quantitative course and students are expected to be comfortable with basic finance a probability, statistics, regression analysis, and spreadsheet programming.Prereq: FIN 4301 or FIN 4001, CSP 1,2,6
FIN 4305FIN 4020Financial Statement Analysis and Introduction to Loan StructuringRequired Finance minor, BBA electiveStudents intensively examine financial statements and business characteristics to learn the information content of financial statements. Applications focus on how they can be used to identify the pattern of funds need for a business and the best financing vehicle to meet that need. The primary tools of analysis are financial statement construction, cash flow statements, financial ratios, common sized statements, cash budgets, Performa statements, sustainable growth rates, and cost volume profit analysis. Students evaluate the needs of a variety of companies that differ with respect to type, industry, profitability, growth, seasonality, cyclicality, and degree of distress. The primary teaching method is case analysis, and a significant course objective is development of communication skills.Prereq: FIN 3300 or FIN 3300 and FIN 4301 or FIN 4001, and FIN4302 o
FIN 4307FIN 4040Foundation in International FinanceFinance minor electiveThis course exposes students to foreign exchange risk and develops their understanding of institutional realities encountered by the financial manager in a global economic environment. Activities of currency arbitrage, hedging, and speculation are examined in light of exchange rate regimes, euro currency markets, the balance of payments, mechanics of foreign exchange conditions in international finance, and international trade activities.Prereq: FIN 4301 or FIN 4001, and FIN 4302 or FIN 4002, CSP 1, 2, 6
HIS 1305HIST 1140Intro African & African-Amer HistoryRequired IUGB coreIntroduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.Prereq: University status
HIS 1305HIST 1140Intro African & African-Amer HistoryRequired IUGB coreIntroduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.Prereq: University status
HIS 1305HIST 1140Intro African & African-Amer HistoryRequired IUGB coreIntroduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.Prereq: University status
HIS 1305HIST 1140Intro African & African-Amer HistoryRequired IUGB coreIntroduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.Prereq: University status
HIS 1305HIST 1140Intro African & African-Amer HistoryRequired IUGB coreIntroduction to African and African-American History. African History and Culture. The coming of Africans to the Americas and the development of African-American Culture.Prereq: University status
HIS 2305HIST 2110Survey of United States HistoryRequired IUGB coreA thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either > CCo requisite: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102CSP 1,6,7
HIS 2305HIST 2110Survey of United States HistoryRequired IUGB coreA thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either > CCo requisite: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102CSP 1,6,7
HIS 2305HIST 2110Survey of United States HistoryRequired IUGB coreA thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either > CCo requisite: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102CSP 1,6,7
HUM 2301PERS 2001Perspectives on Comparative CulturesHumanities electiveA group of interdisciplinary courses that provide a better understanding of the contemporary world through the study of different cultures. One course from this category may be used to fulfill requirements in Area B, Institutional Options.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
HUM 2301PERS 2001Perspectives on Comparative CulturesHumanities electiveA group of interdisciplinary courses that provide a better understanding of the contemporary world through the study of different cultures. One course from this category may be used to fulfill requirements in Area B, Institutional Options.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
LIT 2305ENGL 2120British LiteratureHum & General electiveHistorical survey of literature from the British Isles, with consideration of literary genres, conventions, and modes. Issues such as language change, periodization, canon formation, national identity, and the interrelationships between literature and other elements of culture.Prereq: ENG 1301 or ENGL 1101 either > C or equivalent, CSP 1,6,7

MET Major requirementSurvey of manufacturing processes. Application of machine tools, measuring tools, and primary processes to the manufacturing cycle. 3hours lecture, 2 hours labFreshman status

Static equilibrium conditions of forces, moments, friction, centroids, trusses, and moments of inertia.
Laboratory experiments using standard measuring devices for performing hydraulic and pneumatic tests, non compressible fluid piping systems, turbines, and pump stations.Prereq: credit for or concurrent enrollment in MET 3318

Experimentation to determine the mechanical properties of materials including tensile strength, hardness, creep, and toughness.credit for or concurrent enrollment in MET 3355

Fluid properties, static fluid forces, buoyancy and pressure measurement. Fluid dynamics, including conservation laws, fluid pumps, motors and flow measurement devices.
Heat and energy conversions and properties of gases and liquids. First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and applications. Thermodynamic power cycles and applications.
Piping design problems associated with heat exchangers, pumps, horizontal and vertical vessels, pipeways, and plant layouts. Design concepts used in preparation of piping arrangement, elevation, and isometric drawings.
Stresses, strains, torsion, shear and moment in beams. Bending and combined stresses. Analysis of columns.
The motion of particles and rigid bodies, including forces, mass acceleration, work, and energy. Analysis of devices, including four-bar linkages, sliders, and gear trains.
Prerequisite: MET 3355 , MET 1330, and MET 1364 or equivalents. Use of computer-aided design software in the design and engineering of machinery, machine components, and mechanical systems.
MET 4188MET 4188MET 4188Ethics in Engineering TechnologyMET Major requirementEthical considerations and value judgments related to management, engineering, and engineering technology decisions.Prereq: Senior status in the BS MET program

MGS 3301MGS 3010Principles of ManagementBBA coreThis course provides a basic framework for understanding the role and functions of a manager and to explain the principles, concepts, and techniques that can be used in carrying out these functions. It is intended for those who presently hold, or desire to hold, management responsibilities in any organization or enterprise. This is introductory course with particular emphasis on the skills, competencies, techniques and knowledge need to successfully understand and manage an organization.Prereq: BUS 1301 or BUSA 1101 and ECO 2301 or ECON 2105 and ECO 23062 or ECON 2106

MGS 3305MGS 3099Business & EntrepreneurshipBBA coreThe course examines how to start a business and internationalize. Topics covered include: basic entrepreneurial skill development, global expansion of entrepreneurial ventures; methods of small business globalization, opportunities and risks of global expansion; strategies in a global environment. Special consideration is given to key issues in an African context.Prereq: BUS 1301 or BUSA 1101 and ECO 2301 or ECON 2105 and ECO 2302 or ECON 2106
MGS 3310MGS 3100Business AnalysisBBA coreThis course provides a frame of reference for using models in support of decision making in an enterprise, then introduces some of the most commonly useful modeling approaches and principles. Topics covered include model components, simulation, optimization, time series and causal forecasting, decision analysis, Monte Carlo simulation, and quality management. The course emphasizes hands-on application of the techniques using commonly available software, and demonstrates the value of these approaches in a wide variety of functional settings.Prereq: MTH 1370 or MATH 1070. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours.
MGS 3310MGS 3100Business AnalysisBBA coreThis course provides a frame of reference for using models in support of decision making in an enterprise, then introduces some of the most commonly useful modeling approaches and principles. Topics covered include model components, simulation, optimization, time series and causal forecasting, decision analysis, Monte Carlo simulation, and quality management. The course emphasizes hands-on application of the techniques using commonly available software, and demonstrates the value of these approaches in a wide variety of functional settings.Prereq: MTH 1370 or MATH 1070. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours.
MGS 3315MGS 3400Organizational BehaviorBBA coreThis course provides an overview of management in organizations. Students will be introduced to fundamental organizational concepts such as organizational systems, organization design and structure, and the decision making process. In addition, students will be introduced to the study of human behavior in organizations. The organizational behavior topics emphasized include team building, communication, leadership, motivation, ethics and social responsibility. The focus of the course is to examine, from a managerial perspective, the effect of individual, group, and organizational variables on organizational performance.Prereq: Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours
MGS 4305MGS 4110Analysis of Business DataBBA, MGS minor electiveThe aim of this course is to provide the student with the background to run a statistical project from the data collection stage through analysis and interpretation of the results. The course is divided into three major parts. The first part of the course discusses data collection methods including the various common sampling designs and questionnaire development. In the second part, students are introduced to the high-level statistical package SAS to provide them with the power to perform data analysis. In the third part, the students will use the procedures from SAS to analyze and interpret the data.Prereq: MTH 1370 or MATH 1070 and 45 semester hours, or with instructor permission
MGS 4310MGS 4300Managing Human ResourcesBBA coreThis course provides a survey of the field of human resource management. Topics covered include strategic human resource management, recruitment, selection, legal basis of human resource management, performance evaluation, training and development, compensation, and labor relations.Prereq: MGS 3315 or MGS 3400. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours
MGS 4315MGS 4420Principles of LeadershipBSS core electiveStudents critically evaluate the definition and meaning of leadership, developing their own interpretations and definitions of leadership after learning how others have interpreted and defined it. They also analyze their own leadership strengths and limitations and engage in activities to improve their leadership skills.Prereq: MGS 3340 or MGS 3400. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours.

MGS 4325MGS 4700Operations ManagementBBA core, MGS minor electiveStudy and analysis of planning, design, direction, and control of physical and human resources used in production of goods and services. Emphasis on solutions to operational problems in physical, locational, storage and general service subsystems.Prereq: MGS 3315 or MGS 3400 and MGS 3310 or MGS 3100. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours.

MGS 4499MGS 4993(Formerly BUSA 4980) Strategic Management (capstone)BBA coreThis course integrates all the concepts and theory from the discipline studied and allows the student to produce an innovative piece of work. The specifics of the project are identified by the faculty advisor or professor teaching the course. Formerly MGS 4993.Prereq: Senior status and all 3000 level management requirements. Last semester of senior year

MKT 3301MKT 3310MKT 3010Principles of MarketingBBA coreAs the marketplace continues to adopt more electronic tools to facilitate business processes and expand to the international arena, the discipline of marketing is emerging as more important than ever in helping organizations better assure their ongoing viability. This course provides an overview of marketing as a management process. Upon successful completion, students will gain the ability to make better business decisions by understanding how to assess the marketing environment, design and conduct marketing research, and determine what elements are most important to customers as they make purchasing decisions. Topics covered include the use of marketing tools to develop and manage actual products and services, how to maximize prices on those products and services, how to distribute products and services, how to maximize prices on those products and services, and how to promote them. Finally, discussions will take pla

MKT 3305MKT 3100Consumer / Buyer BehaviorMKT minor electiveBasic concepts and research results from marketing and the social sciences are examined with the goal of enabling marketers to better understand customers and meet their needs. The decision process of buyers, factors affecting purchasing decisions, and customer satisfaction are major conceptual areas of the course. Implications for marketing strategies (e.g., market segmentation, product design, and promotion) are discussed.Prereq: MKT 3310 or MKT 3010 (Introduction to Marketing); Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours.
MKT 3310MKT 3300Advertising and Public RelationsMKT minor electiveThis course covers the fundamental concepts and processes underlying integrated marketing communications in a global market place. The discipline?s historical roots and current role of professionals.Prereq: MKT 3010 or MKT 3010. Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 semester hours. BCOM 3950
MKT 3315MKT 3340Sales ManagementBBA, or MKT minor elective, required BBA MKT minorThis course examines the sales management function in contemporary business organizations. Emphasis is placed on the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of a strategic sales program. Specific topics addressed include ethical and legal issues in sales management, selection and recruiting, territory design, quotas, organizing the sales force, compensation, motivation, leadership and coaching, and evaluation of salesperson performance. The course also emphasizes a mix of conceptual and applied information to provide a balanced view of sales management. The strategic nature of sales management decisions is another major topic.Prereq: MKT 3310 or MKT 3010 (Introduction to Marketing); Requires a 2.5 GPA and 45 hours and BUS 3350 or BCOM 3950 (Business Communication and Professional Development)
MKT 3317MKT 3348Marketing ResearchBBA, or MKT minor elective, required BBA MKT minorThis course helps students make effective and efficient use of market information. Organizational issues, problem formulation, secondary data sources, survey sampling, measurement principles, questionnaire design, interviewing, basic data analysis, research ethics, new technologies, and international aspects are all introduced.Prereq: MKT 3310 or MKT 3010 (Introduction to Marketing) and MGS 3310 or MGS 3100 and MTH 1370 or MATH 1070
MKT 4310MKT 4520Marketing ManagementBBA, or MKT minor elective, required BBA MKT minorAn intensive analysis of major marketing decisions facing the firm, such as level, mix, allocation, and strategy of marketing efforts. Specific decision areas investigated include market determination, pricing, physical distribution, product policy, promotion, channel management, and buyer behavior. Competitive, political, legal, and social factors that may affect such areas of decisions are discussed. Cases, models, and problems are used heavily.Prereq: MKT 3310 or MKT 3010 (Introduction to Marketing), three other marketing elective courses, senior standing
MTH 1300MATH 1070Statistics IIUGB core electiveElementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics, basic probability, and distribution of random variables, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, regression and correlation, analysis of count dataPrereq: High School Algebra II or equivalent.

MTH 1300MATH 1070Statistics IIUGB core electiveElementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics, basic probability, and distribution of random variables, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, regression and correlation, analysis of count dataPrereq: High School Algebra II or equivalent.

MTH 1300MATH 1070Statistics IIUGB core electiveElementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics, basic probability, and distribution of random variables, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, regression and correlation, analysis of count dataPrereq: High School Algebra II or equivalent.
MTH 1311MATH 1111College AlgebraIUGB core electiveCollege Algebra. Graphs; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and linear systems.Prereq: Suitable score on the math placement test, or equivalent
MTH 1311MATH 1111College AlgebraIUGB core electiveCollege Algebra. Graphs; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and linear systems.Prereq: Suitable score on the math placement test, or equivalent
MTH 1311MATH 1111College AlgebraIUGB core electiveCollege Algebra. Graphs; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and linear systems.Prereq: Suitable score on the math placement test, or equivalent
MTH 1311MATH 1111College AlgebraIUGB core electiveCollege Algebra. Graphs; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and linear systems.Prereq: Suitable score on the math placement test, or equivalent
MTH 1303MATH 1113Pre-CalculusIUGB core electivePre-Calculus. Trigonometric functions, identities, inverses, and equations; vectors; polar coordinates; conic sections.Prereq: Grade of C or higher in MTH 1301 or MATH 1111, a suitable score on the math placement test, or school approval
MTH 1303MATH 1113Pre-CalculusIUGB core electivePre-Calculus. Trigonometric functions, identities, inverses, and equations; vectors; polar coordinates; conic sections.Prereq: Grade of C or higher in MTH 1301 or MATH 1111, a suitable score on the math placement test, or school approval
MTH 1303MATH 1113Pre-CalculusIUGB core electivePre-Calculus. Trigonometric functions, identities, inverses, and equations; vectors; polar coordinates; conic sections.Prereq: Grade of C or higher in MTH 1301 or MATH 1111, a suitable score on the math placement test, or school approval
MTH 1401MATH 2211Calculus of one Variable IIUGB core electiveCalculus of One Variable I. Limits and Continuity, Differentiation, Mean Value Theorem for Derivatives; applications of differentiation; definition of the integral; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of integration to areaPrereq: MTH 1303 or MATH 1113 with grade of C
MTH 1401MATH 2211Calculus of one Variable IIUGB core electiveCalculus of One Variable I. Limits and Continuity, Differentiation, Mean Value Theorem for Derivatives; applications of differentiation; definition of the integral; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of integration to areaPrereq: MTH 1303 or MATH 1113 with grade of C
MTH 1402MATH 2212Calculus of One Variable IIRequired STEMCalculus of One Variable II. Applications and techniques of integration; transcendental and trigonometric functions; polar coordinates; infinite sequences and series; indeterminate forms; improper integrals.Prereq: MTH 2411 or MATH 2211 with grade of C or higher

MTH 1403MATH 2215Calculus IIIRequired STEMCalculus III. Real valued functions of several variables, limits, continuity, differentials, directional derivatives, partial derivatives, chain rule, multiple integrals, applications.Prereq: MTH 1402 or MATH 2212 with grade of C or higher

MTH 2300MATH 2420Discrete Mathematics= CSC 2315/CSC 2510Required MTHDiscrete Mathematics. Introduction to discrete structures which are applicable to computer science. Topics include number bases, logic, sets, Boolean algebra, and elementary concepts of graph theory.Prereq: MTH 1303 or MATH 1113 with grade of C or higher
MTH 2302MATH 2331Introductory Linear AlgebraRequired MTHIntroductory Linear Algebra. Theory and applications of matrix algebra and linear transformations. Topics include linear equations, vector spaces, matrices, subspaces, and bases.Prereq: MTH 1403 or MATH 2215 with grades of C or higher
MTH 2303Engineering MathematicsMET ProgramThis course provides the essential mathematics needed throughout all engineering disciplines. Topics covered include: First order ordinary differential equations and initial value problems; higher order differential equations; vector spaces, matrices, determinants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues; applications to systems of first order equations; Laplace transforms, Fourier SeriesStudents may not have credits for both MTH 3300 Differential Equations and MTH 2303 Engineering MathematicsPrereq: MTH 1403 Calculus III
MTH 3300MTH 3360MATH 3260Differential EquationsRequired MTHDifferential Equations. First-order equations, linear differential equations with special emphasis on constant coefficient and Euler equations, systems of equations, applications. Formerly MATH 3260Prereq: MTH 1403 or Math 2215 with grade of C or higher
MTH 3301MTH 4341MATH 4441Abstract AlgebraRequired MTHModern Algebra I. Axiomatic approach to algebraic structures, groups, permutations, homomorphisms, and factor groups. Formerly MATH 4441.Prereq: MTH 3333 or MATH 3333 and MTH 2331 or MATH 2331 with grade of C or higher
MTH 3303MTH 3333MATH 3333Intermediate AnalysisRequired MTHThis course is a rigorous theorem/proof-type course in analysis. Its role is to prepare students for advanced mathematics, especially for all math courses in analysis. The goal of the course is to teach students mathematical reasoning and the construction of proofs in the environment of R1. Topics covered include the topology of R1, convergence and limits, and the proofs of well-known calculus theorems such as the Mean Value Theorem, the Intermediate Value Theorem, the Inverse Function Theorem in R1, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Prereq: MTH 2300 or MATH 2420, with grade of C or higher or consent of faculty advisor, Co-requisite: MTH 1403 or MATH 2215 Calculus III
MTH 4300MTH 4351MATH 4751Mathematical Statistics IRequired MTHMathematical Statistics I. Probability, random variables and their distributions, mathematical expectation, moment generating functions, sampling distributions. Formerly MATH 4751.Prereq: MTH 1403 (MATH 2215) with grade of C or higher
MTH 4301MTH 4371MATH 4671Transforms in Applied MathRequired MTHTransforms in Applied Mathematics. The Laplace transforms discrete and continuous Fourier Transforms, z-transforms, discrete filters, and wavelets. Formerly MATH 4671.Prereq: MTH 3300 (MATH 3260) and MTH 2302 (MATH 2331) with grade of C or higher
MTH 4302MTH 4320Introduction to Stochastic ProcessesRequired Math Course for BS MTHTo be provided.Prereq: MTH 3303, MTH 4300, CSP: 2
MTH 4303MTH 4335MATH 4435Linear AlgebraRequired MTHLinear Algebra. Theory and applications of matrix algebra, vector spaces, and linear transformations; topics include characteristic values, the spectral theorem, and orthogonality. Formerly MATH 4435.Prereq: MTH 3301 (MATH 3333) and MTH 2302 (MATH 2331) with grade of C or higher
MTH 4304MTH 4300MATH 4610Numerical Analysis IRequired MTHNumerical Analysis I. Nature of error; iteration; techniques for nonlinear systems; zeros of functions; interpolation; numerical differentiation; Newton-Cotes formulae for definite integrals; computer implementation of algorithms. Formerly MATH 4610.Prereq: MTH 1403 (MATH 2215) with grade of C or higher and the ability to program in a high level language
MTH 4305MATH 4661Real Analysis IRequired MTHReal Analysis I. The real number system, basic topology of metric spaces, sequences and series, limits and continuity. Formerly MATH 4661.Prereq: MTH 2331 (MATH 2331) with grade of C or higher, Co-requisite: MTH 4335 (MATH 4435)
MTH 4310MTH 4352MATH 4752Mathematical Statistics IIMTH electiveMathematical Statistics II. Theory of estimation and hypothesis testing, applications of statistical inference, introduction to regression and correlation. Formerly MATH 4752.Prereq: MTH 4300 or MATH 4751 with grade of C or higher
MTH 4312ACS 4345 = MTH 4345 Probability and StatisticsAdvanced Math Approved CourseProbability and Statistics. Prerequisite: ACS 3350 or RMI 3750 or MTH 4351 (MATH 4751). CSP: 2. This course covers 1) uni-variate probability distributions, including binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, uniform, exponential, chi-square, beta, Pareto, lognormal, gamma, Weibull, and normal; 2) multivariate joint distributions, conditional and marginal distributions; 3) moments and moment generating function, 4) transform of variables, 5) order statistics, and 6) central limit theorem. The purpose of this course of reading is to develop knowledge of the fundamental probability tools for quantitatively assessing risk. The application of these tools to problems encountered in actuarial science is emphasized. A thorough command of probability topics and the supporting calculus is assumed. (=Mathematical Foundation of Actuarial Science Mathematical Statistics for ACS)P
MTH 4333MTH 4498MATH 4998InternshipMTHGeneral electiveProgram to combine academic training with professional experience through short-term internships. Formerly MATH 4998.Prereq: Junior or Senior Status and Faculty Advisor Approval

PHL 1300PHIL 1010Critical ThinkingGeneral Elective & HumanitiesCritical Thinking. Development of practical, logical, and problem solving skills important to all disciplines, with emphasis on the composition of argumentative essays. Definitions, types of meanings, fallacious and deceptive arguments, deductive and inductive reasoning. Introduction to major forms of scientific and logical reasoning used across humanities, sciences and social sciences, including deductive, hypotheticodeductive, and inductive arguments such as statistical, causal, and analogical. Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7

PHL 3310PHIL 3030Contemporary Moral ProblemsBSS core, General & Hum electiveSelected moral issues, such as abortion, euthanasia, environmentalism, genetic engineering, feminism, animal rights, gay and lesbian rights, and political violence. Brief coverage of ethical theories as they relate to the issues at hand.Prereq: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102 either >= C, CSP 1,6,7
PHY 1401PHYS 2211Principles of Physics IIUGB core electiveMechanics, Heat, and Waves. PHY 1401/PHY 1402, formerly PHYS 2211/PHYS 2212 is the beginning sequence for students majoring in physics, chemistry, or geology. It is recommended for mathematics majors and other students with the necessary mathematical background. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.Prereq: MTH 1401 or Math 2211 either >= D, CSP 1,6,7
PHY 1402PHYS 2212Principles of Physics IIIUGB core electiveElectricity and magnetism, light, modern physics. Phys 2211K/2212K is the beginning sequence for students majoring in physics, chemistry, or computer science. It is recommended for mathematics majors and other students with the necessary mathematical background. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.Prereq: MTH 1402 or Math 2212 and PHY 1401 or PHYS 2211K both >= D
PHY 3300PHYS 3500ElectronicsRequired CSCFundamentals of analog and digital circuit design; discrete and integrated circuit devices; electronic instrumentation.Prereq: PHY 1402 or PHYS 2212 either with grade of D or higher
POL 1301POLS 1101Introduction to American GovernmentRequired IUGB core, POLAmerican system of government covering the institutions and ideals basic to the American experience and the process by which the public participates in and is governed by these institutions and ideals.Prereq: Freshman status
POL 1301POLS 1101Introduction to American GovernmentRequired IUGB core, POLAmerican system of government covering the institutions and ideals basic to the American experience and the process by which the public participates in and is governed by these institutions and ideals.Prereq: Freshman status
POL 1301POLS 1101Introduction to American GovernmentRequired IUGB core, POLAmerican system of government covering the institutions and ideals basic to the American experience and the process by which the public participates in and is governed by these institutions and ideals.Prereq: Freshman status
POL 2301POLS 2101Introduction to Political ScienceRequired POL, General & SS ElectiveA survey of the fundamental questions in the study of political science.Prereq: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102
POL 2315POLS 2401Introduction to International RelationsRequired IUGB coreAn introduction to international relations focusing on contemporary issues in world politics such as conflict and cooperation, business and trade, population, environment, and human rights. (Formerly POLS 2401 Global Issues.)Prereq: ENG 1302 or ENGL 1102
POL 3320POLS 3200Comparative PoliticsRequired POL majors & minor, General electiveComparative analysis of major political systems.Prereq: POL 2301 or POLS 2101
POL 3311POLS 3700 (formerly 3206)Public AdministrationRequired POL majors & minorStudy of administrative principles and practices in the areas of organization, personnel management, budgeting, government regulations and democratic controls. Prereq: POL 2401 or POLS 2101
POL 3310POLS 3310Political TheoryRequired POL majors & minorRecurring themes and problems in the study of politics; draws upon classical and modern works.Prereq: POL 2301 or POLS 2101
POL 3320POLS 3400International RelationsRequired POL majors & minors, General electiveConcepts and theories of international politics. Covers the evolution of the contemporary international system and conflict and cooperation among nation states. Formerly POLS 3400.Prereq: POL 2301 or POLS 2101 or POL 2341 or POLS 2401
POL 3330POLS 3800Introduction to Political ResearchRequired POL majors & minor, General electiveResearch techniques in political science including data collection, analysis, and interpretation.Prereq: MTH 1370 or MATH 1070 and POL 2301 or POLS 2101
POL 4310POLS 4215Politics of Peace = SPH 4340 SPCH 4540POL majors and minor electiveExplores the challenges of building stable political systems in the wake of civil war, using cases drawn from all regions of the world.Prereq: POL 3320 or POLS 3200 prerequisite or co-requisite
POL 4311POLS 4230African PoliticsPOL major electiveAddresses the politics of Sub-Saharan Africa, including major issues of political, economic, and social analysis.Prereq: POL 3310 or POLS 3200 prerequisite or co-requisite

POL 4320POLS 4420International SecurityIR minor electiveThe threats of nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, the economic and military rise of new superpowers, trans-national narcotic trafficking, failed states, informational leaks, and global pandemic diseases are among the most challenging international security threats of the upcoming decade. Students will analyze these key threats to international security that have emerged in the post-Cold War era and their implications in carrying out foreign policy.Prereq: POL 3320 or POLS 3400 or POL 2315 or POLS 2401, prerequisite or co-requisite

POL 4325POLS 4443Comparative Public PolicyPOL major & minor electiveAnalysis of domestic policy in both advanced industrialized democracies and developing countries, looking at both policy process and policy substance. Attention will be given to the questions of how and why policies differ across countries, and how one might evaluate policy performance cross-nationally (adapted from PSC 443: Comparative Public Policy, UAB)Prereq: POL 3310 or POLS 3200 prerequisite or co-requisite

POL 4350POLS 4910Diplomatic SimulationsPOL majors, IR & POL minors electiveThis course is an introduction to diplomacy and foreign policy decision making through the use of a course-long computer simulation. This is an online course using the Statecraft simulation package. The online features of the course make for active learning experiences. The Statecraft program allows students to take the roles of foreign policy decision makers and sort through the tradeoffs and responsibilities that characterize real world politics. For instance students will make real world diplomatic decisions on trade, war, spying, two-level games, and diplomatic interaction with each other. This class is offered online.Prereq: POL 2315 or POLS 2401

POL 4395POLS 4991Directed Reading & ResearchPOL majors, IR & POL minors electiveSpecial directed research. Paper required. By arrangement at student request, as approved by the department. May be repeated for credit.Advisor approval needed
POL 4499POLS 4994Senior SeminarRequired POLCapstone course. Students work with faculty to develop their senior project, a 20 to 25-page research paper on a topic relevant to a job or graduate school that they intend to apply to, and present a series of presentations on their project for discussion by fellow students and faculty.Prereq: POL 3330 or POLS 3800
PSY 1301PSYC 1101Introduction to General PsychologyGeneral & SS ElectiveA broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing abnormal behavior, development, learning, memory, and personality.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
PSY 1301PSYC 1101Introduction to General PsychologyGeneral & SS ElectiveA broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing abnormal behavior, development, learning, memory, and personality.Prereq: Freshman status, CSP 1,6,7
UPP 0009UPP 0099Math ReinforcementUPPA transition from elementary algebra to college algebra. Topics include operations with radicals, graphing of linear and nonlinear functions, algebra of linear and nonlinear functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, review of factoring and quadratic functions. Applications will be emphasized. Students will address specific areas of weakness with supervision by instructor.Prereq: MATH Placement test